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The Ruin of Charles Lynch 

A suspense-thriller novel

by Phyllis E. Davis

96,100 words

When two crooked judges blackmail the owner of an escort service for five million dollars,
she and her husband decide to divorce for two years, marry new spouses in bad health,
and hope they die within a few months to inherit their money, pay off the judges
and then get married again; their plan does not go as expected.
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Writing is Like Flying

    Writing is like flying. “My office has waffle foam on the doorway to reduce the noise so I can write without distraction. There is also a wooden gate that prevents the dogs from scratching on the door. When I leave my office, I’m overwhelmed by reality and feel slightly dizzy and nauseous in …

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Time is My Own Illusion

“The truth (for me) is that every day is a new day. My philosophy mentor is Jiddu Krishnamurti. He believes every moment is a new moment if we don’t drag our imagined identity in and sling memories around like a baseball bat (he said it much more eloquently.) In the last few years, I’ve been able to …

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Today Was a Good Writing Day

  “When the muse blesses me with original thought and whispers fresh pithy dialogue in my ear, I relax and let myself trust again. This is the magic of creation. I explode and feel the breeze moving through me.” – Phyllis E. Davis, author, The Ruin of Charles Lynch.

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Writing is Freezing Time

‘Freezing time does not happen every time I write. Often, time is drippy and sticky and common and I hate it. When a sentence dries and it’s the most honest sentence I can write, I’ve been known to tremble with gratification. There’s no where to run. Awareness is the only road home and there are …

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Not all Writers Are Sadists, Just Few of Us.

  “Characters in novels don’t practice trivial behaviors like picking up the mail unless it enhances the  story’s plot line. We don’t include our hero’s choice of boxers over briefs (unless there’s a reason to mention it), but we do include the things that motivates or breaks them. Not all writers are sadists, just  few of us. …

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The Muse, the Breeze and the Music

The Muse, the Breeze and the Music There is no breeze like the breeze of fresh original thought.” – Phyllis E. Davis, author, The Ruin of Charles Lynch

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The Flow of Good Dialogue

“Good writing requires the flexibility of a gymnast to be able to argue both sides of a debate between characters. Good dialogue flows back and forth like dancers moving in each other’s arms to a beat only they can hear.” – Phyllis E. Davis, author, The Ruin of Charles Lynch

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Breathing Life Into my Characters

“I have ‘skin the game’ (as my hero Nassim Nicholas Taleb states in his new book.) Conjuring a character from the ethos and giving them life means they can live forever without a mortal coil.” – Phyllis Davis, author, The Ruin of Charles Lynch

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I’ve Done Enough

“The world has gone quite mad. You will find me in my office writing or walking along the lake front with my handsome husband, Colle. It’s my turn.” – Phyllis E. Davis, author, The Ruin of Charles Lynch  

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“Books Aren’t Written, They’re Rewritten.” Michael Crichton

                                           

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The Phoenix is my Spirit Animal

“I’ve abandoned my novel fifty times over the past two years. I’ve cried, ignored my manuscript, complained and stewed. Then, after my melt down, I began again and my book takes me back like a hurt lover.” Phyllis E. Davis, author, The Ruin of Charles Lynch.

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The Brain Surgeon and the Author

  “For more about my friend and editor, Robert Rotenberg, http://www.robertrotenberg.com. He has a new suspense thriller coming out in August, Heart of the City. He is a criminal attorney in Toronto and considered the John Grisham of Canada. I love and respect this man and we all need to buy his new book. I’ll …

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Literary Pilgrimage to F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Grave Site

“My husband, Colle, and I planning a literary pilgrimage to Rockville, Maryland, (a two-hour drive from our home) to visit the grave site of F. Scott Fitzgerald and his wife Zelda, who lie together at St. Mary’s Church Historic Cemetery in Rockville, Maryland. Written on the foot of their gravestone is the last line from …

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Like Icarus, I Fell Broken From the Sky

“The story of my book had to be told. I had no choice as it erupted inside of me like a flower growing up through a crack in the sidewalk until it saw the light of day. It pushed and challenged me until I wrote the final two words in the book, ‘The End.’  – …

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Writing Involves Risk

“I once heard that F. Scott Fitzgerald only wrote one-hundreds words per day but they were the right words. I’m learning to delete sections, chapters, dialogue and failed plot twists I’ve slaved over for a thousand hours to write. The more I write, the less I suffer major losses of good writing.” – Phyllis E. …

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Taking Diction from the Ethers

23   “Taking dictation from the ethers requires letting go of the clutter and allowing fresh ideas to flow through my fingers. It’s an act of self forgetting and letting the gate swing open.” – Phyllis E. Davis, author, The Ruin of Charles Lynch

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Writing is Like Prostitution -I’ve become a slut for syntax.

“It’s clear to me now. I’ve become a slut for syntax. It takes a pianist or ballet dancer decades to perfect their chosen art form. Writers don’t have the luxury of perfection because no one can ever master the craft of writing. We can improve if we’re dedicated, study, attend conferences, and read a lot, …

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Writers Share a Secret

  “Painters love the light. Dancers love the music. Writers love the gloom. We can’t help but complain about our difficulties and secretly, we harbor a secret belief that we are misunderstood by the world.” – Phyllis E. Davis, author, The Ruin of Charles Lynch  

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Regrets Have More Power Than My Fears

  “If I had made safer choices, I’m quite sure I’d be miserable today. Instead, I have failed so often that I’ve learned courage and compassion. Old Japanese Proverb: ‘Nana korobi ya oki” which roughly translates as ‘fall down seven times and get up eight.” – Phyllis Davis, author, The Ruin of Charles Lynch

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Are you a Starter or a Finisher?

“Quitting is easy but it smacks of missed opportunities and failed dreams. In life, there are starters and finishers. I’m equal parts of both. I see challenges most people walk away from, and I think to myself, “I’ll do it, hide and watch.”  – Phyllis E. Davis, author, The Ruin of Charles Lynch.

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